Symbiosis: Jewish Education and the Learning Sciences

Symbiosis: Jewish Education and the Learning Sciences
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Dr. Sam Abramovich

Assistant Professor | University at Buffalo - SUNY

How are Jewish education and the learning sciences symbiotic? In this elucidating talk, Sam Abramovich shares with us the unexpected points of connection between Jewish education and the learning sciences, and ... See more

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What the Learning Sciences Can Learn from Jewish Education

In Dr. Sam Abramovich's recent ELI talk, he eloquently describes the existing and potential symbiosis that exists between Jewish Education and the Learning Sciences. And he makes a compelling argument how Jewish Education can learn from the empirical research from the Learning Sciences.

Peer education: The untapped potential

Some general guidelines for the integration of peer tutoring and peer collaboration in the classroom are offered. It is recognized that specific curriculum plans implementing these guidelines must be formulated with a view to the overall cultural context of the school system. Such plans must be molded in context to suit the needs of each particular site.

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Dr. Sam  Abramovich, 

Assistant Professor | University at Buffalo - SUNY

Sam Abramovich is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University at Buffalo. His research is devoted to finding and understanding the learning opportunities between the intersection of the Learning Sciences and Emerging Technology. Most recently, he has been studying how gamification and educational badges can increase motivation to learn and support cultural identity in Jewish and secular education. Dr. Abramovich holds a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh, was named a recipient of an Edmund W. Gordon MacArthur Foundation/ETS Fellowship. Previously, Dr. Abramovich was a researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD., a technology coordinator for the Rashi School in Newton, MA., and a serial dot-commer.