Jewish Perspectives on Happiness

Jewish Perspectives on Happiness
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Dr. David Pelcovitz

Jewish Education Chair | Yeshiva University

What makes us happy? Dr. David Pelcovitz delves into the intersections of the secular view of happiness and the Jewish view of happiness (simcha). He uses the examples of goal setting, mindfulness, and gratitud... See more

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What Makes Us Happy? A Symposium

What Makes Us Happy? A Symposium The search for happiness is as old as humanity itself. In Jewish culture, the subject of happiness surfaces in biblical psalms, rabbinic commentary, Talmudic pilpul and the musings of the Mussar and Hasidic movements, to name a few.

The Consequences of Great Expectations

A new study by TC's Suniya Luthar and colleagues confirms elevated rates of substance abuse, depression and other problems among affluent youth A new study by TC's Suniya Luthar and colleagues confirms elevated rates of substance abuse, depression and other problems among affluent youth In 2009, when the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry published an editorial statement proclaiming the rapid spread of "affluenza" - described as "a metaphorical illness connoting hyper-investment in material wealth, among upper-middle class, white-collar families" - it was directly alluding, in part, to the research of Teachers College psychologist Suniya Luthar.

How About Some Gratitude - and Happiness - This Thanksgiving?

Everyone knows that the American calendar dedicates a time explicitly for gratitude: Thanksgiving. But did you know that the practice of thankfulness is also embedded in the Jewish tradition? With the approach of the Thanksgiving holiday, it seems fitting to investigate these roots further.

Dr. David  Pelcovitz, 

Jewish Education Chair | Yeshiva University

David Pelcovitz, Ph.D. holds the Gwendolyn and Joseph Straus Chair in Jewish Education at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education. He also teaches courses in pastoral psychology at the university’s affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary and serves as special assistant to the president of Yeshiva University. He has published and lectured extensively on positive psychology, trauma, loss and child abuse.